Hurricane Harvey Postpones First Day of School

Part of a Houston freeway completely submerged in water as a result of Hurricane Harvey.

The flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

Harvey, the storm classified as a Category 4 hurricane at its peak, has dumped more than 40 inches of rain onto Houston and the surrounding towns in the last week of August. A metropolitan area the size of the State of Delaware flooded as much as fourteen feet deep, affecting as many as 13 million people.

As with many natural disasters, children are among those most disrupted. Houston’s more than 300 schools, which ought to have begun classes on Monday, August 28, are filled with evacuees instead of students. And a few are filled with water. Around 45 schools and educational administrative buildings have some storm damage, up to and including significant flooding.

So Houston and at least 9 other nearby school districts have pushed back their first day until the first week of September. In Houston, that means approximately 215,000 students.

Richard Carranza, superintendent of the Houston Independent School District, is cautious, but hopeful about that date.

“Thank goodness it seems like we’re pulling through, but the flooding is not over yet,” said Carranza to US News. “There is a possibility that even on [Sept. 5], depending on the severity of impact to our facilities, we may have a rolling start. It may be that 75 percent of schools are up and ready to go and they’ll get going, and as other schools are able to be cleaned and refurbished, then they will open.

“Probably the most obvious thing is we’ve had to call off the whole first week of school, but our first concern is the safety of our students, teachers and community,” he added.

It’s possible that in the time before then, city infrastructure won’t be back to the point where every student can access the schools. And the school district’s buses have been pressed into service moving evacuees. At the more human level, many students will have lost everything. 30,000 homes and counting are gone, with the city’s poor being the worst-hit. But studies worldwide have shown that the best thing to do for students in a disaster situation is to re-establish routines as close to normal as possible. So back to school it is, as soon as can be managed.

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