Midterm Tips for Teachers

A clock with a note next to it that reads, "midterm cram."

Photo credit: Shutterstock

With winter break only a few weeks away, it’s about that point in the school year when students become stressed and overwhelmed with midterms. It’s time to check in with students on how they’re handling their workload. If they are worried or struggling, here are a few ideas that may help.

1. Create An Even Workload

Assigning lots of homework at the last minute will always be tempting, but it means there’s no time left to course-correct if something goes wrong. Evenly space out study sessions so that it’s an attainable workload. Also, don’t be too rigid with when study sessions have to be. Students have lives outside of school, and they appreciate flexibility.

2. Schedule Breaks

Recharge breaks are important, and with practice can become a a healthy habit. Giving your students a break every half hour or so is vital to retaining focus and attention. Take five, listen to a quick podcast, stretch, or have a snack.

3. Clarify Instructions

This one seems obvious, but it bears reinforcing. Remind your student to make certain that they fully understand their assignment. This is a skill (or perhaps just a habit) that will carry over to test-taking, and will serve your students well into the future.

4. Exercise A Little Leniency 

Students make mistakes; it’s part of learning. But instead of chastising them for it, help them develop a system for learning from those mistakes. Build study guides out of failed tests. Keep a notebook of missed problems and see if your student can track for themselves where they need more work and where they just need to pay more attention. Encourage them to revisit problem topics.

5. Teach Students About Anxiety

Nerves go hand-in-hand with mistakes. American schools are so score-oriented that mistakes can often feel oversized and overwhelming to students. This creates fear, which they’ll carry forward into future tests and assignments. If you notice your student struggling with anxiety, teach them how to develop healthy coping mechanisms. Explain to them how mental health and emotional health can impact academic performance.

Advertisements