Elementary School Students Help With Hurricane Relief Efforts

A photo of boxes full of Hurricane Harvey donations.

Hurricane Harvey donations.
Photo credit: michelmond / Shutterstock

“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’”

Today’s generation of young students may not have grown up on the gentle and affectionate wisdom of Mister Rogers, but they perhaps embody it more than any previous. Just look at the students of Jefferson Elementary School. Nine and ten years old, these Iowan students saw the devastation of Hurricane Harvey hundreds of miles south and wanted to help.

“You watch the news and you see all the devastation down there and you say, ‘We really should do something about it,’ and a lot of the kids at the school felt that way, so here we are,” said Edwin Colon, the school counselor who supervised the kids’ effort.

The students together raised several hundred dollars for the hurricane relief, mostly in spare change and fund from the student council. Colon coordinated more resources; he enlisted the support of local supermarket Hy-Vee, which made sure the students’ money reached farther when they shopped for supplies there. He also arranged for TanTara Transportation, a local trucking company, to donate a truck and driver to take the supplies down south into devastated Houston.

For students this young, this is a tremendous undertaking, and every one of them involved should be proud. But what they’ve done hasn’t only benefitted those people who will be receiving their donations; this kind of empathy, the kind that drives one to action, is the sort of thing that creates an adult who will be aware of their impact on the world and will not assume they are helpless in a crisis. This is our rising generation, and we should be awestruck at the shape it is taking.

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The Partnership Between Art and Tech

A machine drawing a painting.

Photo credit: Shutterstock

It’s no surprise that in the digital age, art and technology are increasingly combining in new ways. Everything from art created via audience participation to the literal use of new tech—computers, cell phones, digital data, and more—is changing the definition of art and how it’s presented.

PNCA grad Angélica Maria Millán Lazon‘s Engendradxs, for example, uses a combination of traditional and more modern technology. By combining fabrics, photographs, and smartphone videos, the presentation gives voice to several generations of women in Millán Lazon’s family. The installation was shown at the Williamson | Knight Gallery in April and at PNCA’s exhibit of MFA projects in June.

But the intersection of art and technology started long before Millán Lazon’s smartphones—and in many cases, it’s been even more elaborate. At London’s “Digital Revolution” show back in 2014, a series of artists displayed projects incorporating everything from audience interaction, lasers, pollution data, and robotics.

Umbrellium’s “Assemblance,” for example, used computer-controlled lasers to create ever-changing light displays based on audience movement and interactions. Visitors literally left trails of light in their wake, thanks to custom-created camera tracking, audio, smoke machines, projectors, computers, and more. For added interest: the audience could create light shows on their own, but if they interacted together as a group, the result was stronger, more resilient, and more sophisticated.

Another part of “Digital Revolution,” brought to you by Russian mixed media artist Dmitry Morozov, relied on a contraption of Morozov’s design that “sniffed out” pollutants like carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and methane from the streets of Moscow. By inputting the data into a computer program called Arduino, the resulting data was transformed into shapes and colors—a surprisingly colorful movie of pollution.

Experimentation with technology and art continues today as well. During this year’s New York Art Week, The Verge reported on several particularly interesting installations from Chris Dorland and Jacolby Satterwhite, respectively.

Dorland’s work focused on the creation of video of his own painting, as well as images from a spinal reconstruction website. “The underlying idea,” Dorland told The Verge, “is how technology sees the world and how we see things and how the lens records the world we live in. What happens when you put a Cadillac ad in front of a machine that doesn’t care about the content? It’s reading the information and recording it.”

Satterwhite’s offering had more of a direct correlation with his own family history—not unlike Millán Lazon’s Engendradxs. Going through thousands of his mother’s drawings from the 90s, Satterwhite traced anywhere from ten to fifteen of them and composited them together using 3D animation. “Basically I collect disparate archives and synthesize them together to make incongruent sources and to build a harmonious narrative,” Satterwhite explained.

As our understanding of technology increases—and as artists continue to get more inventive—we’re likely to see even more unusual and innovate combinations of art and technology.

Hurricane Harvey Postpones First Day of School

Part of a Houston freeway completely submerged in water as a result of Hurricane Harvey.

The flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

Harvey, the storm classified as a Category 4 hurricane at its peak, has dumped more than 40 inches of rain onto Houston and the surrounding towns in the last week of August. A metropolitan area the size of the State of Delaware flooded as much as fourteen feet deep, affecting as many as 13 million people.

As with many natural disasters, children are among those most disrupted. Houston’s more than 300 schools, which ought to have begun classes on Monday, August 28, are filled with evacuees instead of students. And a few are filled with water. Around 45 schools and educational administrative buildings have some storm damage, up to and including significant flooding.

So Houston and at least 9 other nearby school districts have pushed back their first day until the first week of September. In Houston, that means approximately 215,000 students.

Richard Carranza, superintendent of the Houston Independent School District, is cautious, but hopeful about that date.

“Thank goodness it seems like we’re pulling through, but the flooding is not over yet,” said Carranza to US News. “There is a possibility that even on [Sept. 5], depending on the severity of impact to our facilities, we may have a rolling start. It may be that 75 percent of schools are up and ready to go and they’ll get going, and as other schools are able to be cleaned and refurbished, then they will open.

“Probably the most obvious thing is we’ve had to call off the whole first week of school, but our first concern is the safety of our students, teachers and community,” he added.

It’s possible that in the time before then, city infrastructure won’t be back to the point where every student can access the schools. And the school district’s buses have been pressed into service moving evacuees. At the more human level, many students will have lost everything. 30,000 homes and counting are gone, with the city’s poor being the worst-hit. But studies worldwide have shown that the best thing to do for students in a disaster situation is to re-establish routines as close to normal as possible. So back to school it is, as soon as can be managed.