How Do We Combat “Alternative Facts” When People Won’t Listen to Real Facts?

A picture of a female teacher with her grade school students.

Photo credit: Ilmicrofono Oggiono at Flickr Creative Commons

Educators, more than anyone else, have a keen interest in tackling the issue of “alternative facts.” But it’s a tough issue to fix when it’s the U.S. government that is perpetuating it. Most of us are aware that study after study, fact after fact, have proven that many of the claims made by the current administration are blatantly false, and yet people are still buying into them.

And it seems like all the facts in the world don’t make a difference, as people carry on believing what they want instead of what is true. According to sociologists, this is steeped in a problem of which most of us are unaware. It turns out that exposing misinformed people to facts not only doesn’t usually get them to change their mind, but actually makes them reinforce their wrong beliefs.

Nobody is quite sure why this happens, though. And it’s possible, likely even, for some educators to question whether or not they and their peers might be to blame. Were these people failed by the educational system? What can we do moving forward to try and prevent such attitudes from arising in current and future students? Is there anything that can be done? Are these attitudes hard-wired or learned at home?

None of these questions have easy answers. The nature of the problem is one that will take a while to find an answer to. But researchers aren’t giving up; they are determined now more than ever to find the answers we’ve all been waiting for.

In the meantime though, perhaps the best that educators can do is continue to teach still-impressionable students the truth. A reliance on facts and critical thinking now, when kids are still learning, might be the greatest tool we have to keep people willing and able to learn in the future.

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