Philadelphia Eagles Player Donates Salary to Educational Orgs

A photo of a Philadelphia Eagles jersey, helmet, and NFL football on a field.

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Chris Long, for those who don’t follow football, is the defensive end for the Philadelphia Eagles. He currently enjoys a two year contract worth $4.5 million dollars. It’s more money than any one person needs, and Long seems to realize that. That’s why he pledged to give the earnings from his first six games of this year to fund two scholarships for students from his hometown of Charlottesville, Virginia. Now, he’s giving the rest of this year’s checks to a new campaign founded by himself and his wife (separate from his Chris Long Foundation).

“My wife and I have been passionate about education being a gateway for upward mobility and equality,” said Long in a statement released to the Associated Press. “I think we can all agree that equity in education can help affect change that we all want to see in this country.”

Pledge 10 for Tomorrow, the new campaign, gives funding to organizations that make education more accessible to underserved youth communities. Long has chosen four organizations in three cities: St. Louis, Boston, and Philly (the cities where he’s played). He is pledging 10 game checks to the foundation, and is encouraging fans to join him to “pledge 10” (either ten recurring payments, or simply $10).

So far, Pledge 10 has raised just over $20,000 along with Long’s donation. Donors get to choose which of the four organizations they want their money to go to (one in each city, and a general fund). The organization with the most donations will receive an additional $50,000.

“There’s a lot of opportunities to help out and they’re wonderful organizations,” Long said. “We have such a great platform as football players and hopefully fans get behind it.”

In a world where athletes are paid more than the annual budget of most schools, it is a relief to see someone on Long’s platform not only speaking up for education, but putting his money where his mouth is.

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Connecticut School Cuts “Grandma” Program

An elderly black woman.

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For more than twenty years, students in Bridgeport, Connecticut have had a little something special in their schools: a crew of foster grandparents serving as teachers’ aids. The volunteer program, overseen by the Bridgeport Child and Family Guidance Center, has placed volunteers over the age of 55 in classrooms, paying them a small stipend with allowances for lunch and transport.

“They come in to our classrooms and assist three to five students with help in reading or math or even social problems they may have,” said Amelia Perroni, a first-grade teacher in one of the schools within the program. “They’re an extra pair of hands in the classroom.”

But extra hands no more. The first week of October, the “grandmas” as their charges call them, were told by letter that the funding for their program has been cut, effective immediately. The 83 participants, many of whom have volunteered with the program since its inception, weren’t even given time to say goodbye to their students.

“It’s very sudden,” said Audrey Fernandes, a volunteer for more than half a decade and a retired paraprofessional herself. “‘Pack your stuff and get out.’”

Teachers at the school are furious. The volunteers, who made $2 per hour as a stipend, worked one-on-one with students who desperately needed it.

“They get paid a measly amount of money. We have people in the upper echelons (of the public schools) making big bucks, and we’re cutting a program. It doesn’t make sense,” said Mary Krotki, a fifth grade teacher. “It’s very important for urban kids. It’s another connection some of them don’t have at home.”

Michael Patota, president of the Child and Family Guidance Center and the one who made the decision to cut the program, recognized the contributions of the volunteers in their severance letter, but insists that the bottom line makes the program unsustainable.

Student Spolight: Zuriel Oduwole

A photo of Zuriel Oduwole taken at the Women in Film 2015 Crystal + Lucy Awards.

Zuriel Oduwole at the Women in Film 2015 Crystal + Lucy Awards.
Photo credit: Featureflash Photo Agency / Shutterstock

When Zuriel Oduwole was twelve years old, she became the youngest producer and editor to have her work shown commercially when a film she made screened in four countries. But her work isn’t entertainment. Oduwole is on a mission, and so far, she’s brought that mission to the leaders of twenty four nations and counting.

Oduwole is a first-generation American citizen, born in Los Angeles to a Mauritian mother and Nigerian father. She was 10 when she made her first film, a documentary for a school assignment called “The Ghana Revolution.” In making it, she met with two former presidents of Ghana at the embassy in Los Angeles, Jerry Rawlings and John Kufuor.

The next year, she found her passion: educational reform, especially for girls.

“I have spoken to presidents and prime ministers about making policies to ensure that girls go to school so that they don’t get married at a very young age like 12 or 13 which happens in some countries. So I have spoken to presidents mostly in the African continent like Nigeria, Tanzania, South Sudan, Kenya, Liberia and also some here in Europe as well like Croatia and Malta,” Oduwole said in an interview with Africa News.

Her 2014 documentary (made at age 11) “A Promising Africa,” won the 7th grader a place in Business Insider’s list of “World’s Most Powerful Person at Every Age” and Elle Magazine’s “33 Women Who Changed the World.”

Oduwole’s not done producing. She puts out at least two documentaries a year, though even now she’s only 15. Since 2015, she’s been working with Proctor and Gamble towards the visibility of women’s educational issues, including their campaign “Unstoppable Like A Girl.”

This all began with a school assignment. While her career goals take Oduwole all over the world, she’s made a point to stay in school herself. She’s currently a sophomore in high school.

Elementary School Students Help With Hurricane Relief Efforts

A photo of boxes full of Hurricane Harvey donations.

Hurricane Harvey donations.
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“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’”

Today’s generation of young students may not have grown up on the gentle and affectionate wisdom of Mister Rogers, but they perhaps embody it more than any previous. Just look at the students of Jefferson Elementary School. Nine and ten years old, these Iowan students saw the devastation of Hurricane Harvey hundreds of miles south and wanted to help.

“You watch the news and you see all the devastation down there and you say, ‘We really should do something about it,’ and a lot of the kids at the school felt that way, so here we are,” said Edwin Colon, the school counselor who supervised the kids’ effort.

The students together raised several hundred dollars for the hurricane relief, mostly in spare change and fund from the student council. Colon coordinated more resources; he enlisted the support of local supermarket Hy-Vee, which made sure the students’ money reached farther when they shopped for supplies there. He also arranged for TanTara Transportation, a local trucking company, to donate a truck and driver to take the supplies down south into devastated Houston.

For students this young, this is a tremendous undertaking, and every one of them involved should be proud. But what they’ve done hasn’t only benefitted those people who will be receiving their donations; this kind of empathy, the kind that drives one to action, is the sort of thing that creates an adult who will be aware of their impact on the world and will not assume they are helpless in a crisis. This is our rising generation, and we should be awestruck at the shape it is taking.

The Partnership Between Art and Tech

A machine drawing a painting.

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It’s no surprise that in the digital age, art and technology are increasingly combining in new ways. Everything from art created via audience participation to the literal use of new tech—computers, cell phones, digital data, and more—is changing the definition of art and how it’s presented.

PNCA grad Angélica Maria Millán Lazon‘s Engendradxs, for example, uses a combination of traditional and more modern technology. By combining fabrics, photographs, and smartphone videos, the presentation gives voice to several generations of women in Millán Lazon’s family. The installation was shown at the Williamson | Knight Gallery in April and at PNCA’s exhibit of MFA projects in June.

But the intersection of art and technology started long before Millán Lazon’s smartphones—and in many cases, it’s been even more elaborate. At London’s “Digital Revolution” show back in 2014, a series of artists displayed projects incorporating everything from audience interaction, lasers, pollution data, and robotics.

Umbrellium’s “Assemblance,” for example, used computer-controlled lasers to create ever-changing light displays based on audience movement and interactions. Visitors literally left trails of light in their wake, thanks to custom-created camera tracking, audio, smoke machines, projectors, computers, and more. For added interest: the audience could create light shows on their own, but if they interacted together as a group, the result was stronger, more resilient, and more sophisticated.

Another part of “Digital Revolution,” brought to you by Russian mixed media artist Dmitry Morozov, relied on a contraption of Morozov’s design that “sniffed out” pollutants like carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and methane from the streets of Moscow. By inputting the data into a computer program called Arduino, the resulting data was transformed into shapes and colors—a surprisingly colorful movie of pollution.

Experimentation with technology and art continues today as well. During this year’s New York Art Week, The Verge reported on several particularly interesting installations from Chris Dorland and Jacolby Satterwhite, respectively.

Dorland’s work focused on the creation of video of his own painting, as well as images from a spinal reconstruction website. “The underlying idea,” Dorland told The Verge, “is how technology sees the world and how we see things and how the lens records the world we live in. What happens when you put a Cadillac ad in front of a machine that doesn’t care about the content? It’s reading the information and recording it.”

Satterwhite’s offering had more of a direct correlation with his own family history—not unlike Millán Lazon’s Engendradxs. Going through thousands of his mother’s drawings from the 90s, Satterwhite traced anywhere from ten to fifteen of them and composited them together using 3D animation. “Basically I collect disparate archives and synthesize them together to make incongruent sources and to build a harmonious narrative,” Satterwhite explained.

As our understanding of technology increases—and as artists continue to get more inventive—we’re likely to see even more unusual and innovate combinations of art and technology.

Hurricane Harvey Postpones First Day of School

Part of a Houston freeway completely submerged in water as a result of Hurricane Harvey.

The flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey.
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Harvey, the storm classified as a Category 4 hurricane at its peak, has dumped more than 40 inches of rain onto Houston and the surrounding towns in the last week of August. A metropolitan area the size of the State of Delaware flooded as much as fourteen feet deep, affecting as many as 13 million people.

As with many natural disasters, children are among those most disrupted. Houston’s more than 300 schools, which ought to have begun classes on Monday, August 28, are filled with evacuees instead of students. And a few are filled with water. Around 45 schools and educational administrative buildings have some storm damage, up to and including significant flooding.

So Houston and at least 9 other nearby school districts have pushed back their first day until the first week of September. In Houston, that means approximately 215,000 students.

Richard Carranza, superintendent of the Houston Independent School District, is cautious, but hopeful about that date.

“Thank goodness it seems like we’re pulling through, but the flooding is not over yet,” said Carranza to US News. “There is a possibility that even on [Sept. 5], depending on the severity of impact to our facilities, we may have a rolling start. It may be that 75 percent of schools are up and ready to go and they’ll get going, and as other schools are able to be cleaned and refurbished, then they will open.

“Probably the most obvious thing is we’ve had to call off the whole first week of school, but our first concern is the safety of our students, teachers and community,” he added.

It’s possible that in the time before then, city infrastructure won’t be back to the point where every student can access the schools. And the school district’s buses have been pressed into service moving evacuees. At the more human level, many students will have lost everything. 30,000 homes and counting are gone, with the city’s poor being the worst-hit. But studies worldwide have shown that the best thing to do for students in a disaster situation is to re-establish routines as close to normal as possible. So back to school it is, as soon as can be managed.

Back-to-School Safety Tips for Students and Parents

Back-to-school safety tips for children and parents

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These aren’t quite the days when kids of all ages were turned loose at dawn to make their own way to school by bus, foot, or bike, but plenty of young students are still given more independence for their commute than they may be prepared for. As students across the country return to school for the 2017-18 school year, police departments everywhere have a few cautions in common.

For students

Make sure that your young student can tell you what the plan is to get them to and from school every day. This is mostly about the youngest kids. Are they always picked up by the same person in the same car? Can they tell you or a teacher the full name of both parents, and what color their car is? If there are custodial issues, do they know their schedule? Do they know your phone number and address? Quiz them until they do—it’s all well and good to have a card in their backpack or data on file with the school, but it’s great to help your young student help themselves.

Also, reinforce your family rules on crossing the street with care, on helmet safety, anything that’s going to be a protection for your child. Make sure you’re following them yourself; your child is watching you for cues.

For parents:

Be careful around schools. You may be running late, stressed, or distracted with your own daily plans, but set all of that aside when you are behind the wheel near any school or school bus. Pedestrian traffic that is mostly minors can be very erratic, and it just takes a second to make a mistake that can’t be undone.

It’s worth it to make time in those first few weeks to arrive early or be able to stay a little late, to get out of your car at the school and meet the staff who manage the bus lines, school administrators, or even the parents of their friends. Making sure you know their faces and they know yours helps protect every student.

Get some other safety tips for students of all ages, and their parents, at the Red Cross website.